HONOR ROLL CLASP

Date of Establishment:

  • Badge – Clasp for the Army (Heer): January 30, 1944
  • Badge – Clasp for the Navy (Kriegsmarine): May 13, 1944
  • Badge – Clasp for the Air Force (Luftwaffe): July 5, 1944

Criteria for Award:

  • Badge – Clasp for the Army (Heer):
    • Being a recipient of the Iron Cross 2nd Class
    • Performing an act of bravery beyond general military duties, but not sufficient for the Knight’s Cross or the German Cross
    • Being appointed as an honorary candidate for the badge – clasp
  • Badge – Clasp for the Navy (Kriegsmarine):
    • Being a recipient of the Iron Cross 2nd Class
    • Performing an act of bravery beyond general military duties, but not sufficient for the Knight’s Cross or the German Cross
  • Badge – Clasp for the Air Force (Luftwaffe):
    • Being a recipient of the Iron Cross 2nd Class
    • Performing an act of bravery beyond general military duties, but not sufficient for the Knight’s Cross or the German Cross
    • Recipients of the Honorary Goblet of the Luftwaffe are automatically eligible for the award of the honorary badge – clasp

Conclusion of Production and Number of Awards:

Production of all badge – clasps continued until the end of 1945, i.e., the end of the war. There were 4556 badge – clasps awarded for the Army (Heer), 37 for the Navy (Kriegsmarine), and the number of badge – clasps awarded for the Air Force (Luftwaffe) is unknown.

Manufacturing Method and Material:

All specimens of the honorary badge – clasp were manufactured using the principle of die forging, and all specimens have an unfinished back. The material used for making the honorary badge – clasps is tombak or tombak-like alloy, which is gilded and polished after shaping, giving the decoration an exceptionally beautiful appearance befitting its significance.

Wearing:

The decoration was worn on both formal occasions and in combat situations. The officially prescribed location and method for wearing it was the second buttonhole on the uniform, where the ribbon for the Iron Cross 2nd Class or the Medal of the Russian Campaign could also be worn. In the case of multiple ribbons, the honorary badge – clasp was worn first, i.e., before all other ribbons.

Presentation:

Due to its importance, the decoration was presented in an elegant black case, often covered with artificial or, in extremely rare cases, genuine leather. The interior of the case for the Army (Heer) badge – clasp is beige or ochre in color, while for the Air Force (Luftwaffe) or Navy (Kriegsmarine) versions, the interior is dark blue. The recipient of the decoration also received an additional award certificate and an entry in the military document – “soldbuch.”

General Description of the Badge:

In all three versions of the honorary badge – clasp, the base is the same. The decoration is composed of an oak leaf wreath, which varies between versions. For the Army (Heer) badge – clasp, the wreath is open at the top and is tied off with a bow at the bottom. The oak leaves are larger than those on the other two versions. Inside the wreath, there is a slightly tilted swastika, which has a groove or line along its edges, giving it a unique appearance and detail.

Measurements (Standard):

  • Badge – Clasp for the Army (Heer):
    • Width: 24.5 millimeters
    • Height: 26 millimeters
    • Depth (maximum): 5 millimeters
  • Badge – Clasp for the Navy (Kriegsmarine):
    • Height: 25.7 millimeters
    • Width: 12.8 millimeters
    • Weight: 2.92 grams (without ribbon)
    • Anchor: 20 millimeters
  • Badge – Clasp for the Air Force (Luftwaffe):
    • Height: 24.4 millimeters
    • Width: 24.4 millimeters
    • Eagle: 18.5 millimeters
    • Weight: 2.5 grams (without ribbon)

Honorary Badges: Kriegsmarine, Heer, and Luftwaffe

It should be noted that all three versions, especially the badge – clasps for the Air Force (Luftwaffe) and Navy (Kriegsmarine), are extremely rare specimens and are therefore often counterfeited and reproduced. Details that most commonly reveal that a Navy badge – clasp is a copy include the bluntness (lack of sharpness) of the badge, the holding of the wreath on the ribbon, and the completeness of the back – all original specimens had an unfinished back, while copies often have this area cut out.

 

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